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NASA releases Ultra-HD video of the Sun


It is always shining, constantly alight and blazing with energy. The Earth is awash in an endless tide of its particles.  The Sun’s energy and light drives our weather, biology and more. But in space, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) keeps an eye on our nearest star 24/7. SDO captures images of the Sun in 10 different wavelengths, each of which helps highlight a different temperature of solar material. In this recently released video we experience images of the Sun in unprecedented detail captured by SDO. Presented in ultra-high definition video (4K) the video presents the nuclear fire of our life-giving star in intimate detail, offering new perspective into our own relationships with grand forces of the solar system.

NASA has created its first few ultra-high definition videos with spectacular results. Among the items released is a magnificent 30-minute portrait of the Sun, which was put together from data captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

Launched in early 2010, the SDO observes the Sun around the clock, capturing images in ten different wavelengths, each of which highlights a different temperature of solar material. By observing these multiple types of radiation, NASA is able to keep tracks on a number of facets of solar activity, such as solar flares and streams of electrified plasma called coronal loops.

By putting it all together in stunning 4K resolution, NASA has created an image of the Sun as you’ve never seen it before.


#NASA #sdo #SolarDynamicsObservatory #sunhd

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